KEEP APARTMENTS AFFORDABLE:

SAY NO TO
HIGHER RENTS


The City of Toronto is proposing new regulations for rental apartment buildings.

Instead of improving services for tenants, the proposed regulations will drive up rents and increase red tape. The City is making it more difficult to build and maintain the high quality rental housing that Toronto’s tenants deserve.

The proposed regulations go to City Council on
December 12, 2016.

THE PROGRAM WILL:

Tenants Already
Pay Too Much

The property tax rate paid by Toronto’s tenants is 2.9 times higher than the property tax rate paid by Toronto’s house and condo owners.

As a result, the average Toronto tenant overpays $85 per month – or $1,000 per year – in rent! That’s just unfair.

Before adding more costs and red tape, the City should start treating tenants fairly and reduce the multi-residential property tax rate.


FAQ

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS


What is the proposed regulatory bylaw for rental apartment buildings?

The City of Toronto is considering a new regulatory bylaw for multi-resident apartment buildings. The bylaw would apply to approximately 3,300 rental apartment buildings.

Buildings subject to this program would be required to pay a significant per unit fee each and every year and file additional paperwork with the City.

That doesn’t sound so bad. What’s wrong with the new regulatory bylaw?

The new per unit fees and administrative burdens will make it more expensive to create and maintain affordable, high quality rental apartment buildings in the City of Toronto.

That means higher rents and more red tape.

Tenants already pay more than their fair share. The City of Toronto’s multi-residential property tax rate is 2.9 times higher than its residential property tax rate. Put another way, the property tax rate paid by Toronto’s tenants is 2.9 times higher than the property tax rate paid by Toronto’s house and condo owners.

The average Toronto tenant overpays $85 per month – or $1,000 per year – in rent as a result of the significantly higher multi-residential property tax rate. That’s just unfair.

Why is the City considering a regulatory bylaw proposal?

The City wants to crack down on problem landlords – the bad apples who continually fail to deliver safe and reliable accommodation.

It’s the right goal but the wrong solution. Good landlords strongly support the City’s efforts to aggressively target bad landlords.

The proposed regulatory bylaw won’t solve the issue of problem landlords. Instead of focusing on the worst offenders the regulatory bylaw will divert City resources to processing additional paperwork and inspecting the thousands of buildings that require no additional oversight.

Are there better ways to crack down on problem landlords?

Yes. The City’s existing Multi-Residential Apartment Building Audit and Enforcement Program (MRAB) is proven and effective. In 2015, compliance rates reached 92%!

The City should build on what works and increase resources and investment in the MRAB Program.